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Henry Wollaston

Male 1593 - 1669  (76 years)


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  • Name Henry Wollaston 
    Born 1593 
    Gender Male 
    Died 25 Dec 1669 
    Person ID I43  Wollaston
    Last Modified 8 Aug 2016 

    Father Edward Wollaston,   b. 1552, Penn, Stafford, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1595  (Age 43 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Wollaston,   d. 1616 
    Family ID F14  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elisabeth White,   d. 27 Dec 1655 
    Married 5 Jun 1621  Saint Michael Bassishaw, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Richard Wollaston, of Losbey and Wormley?,   b. 1635,   d. 1691  (Age 56 years)
    Last Modified 8 Aug 2016 
    Family ID F39  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • HENRY WOLLASTON, the third son of Edward of Perton, was born in or
      just before 1593, for he describes himself as above 70 years old in 1663. He
      was, like his brother John, a citizen of London, and is mentioned with him in their
      unele Henry's Will in 1616. He was a haberdasher by trade, and carried on his
      business in Lombard-street; but in Oct. 1638 he was appointed Keeper of Newgate
      Prison by his brother John, who happened to be Sheriff when this lucrative office
      fell vacant. The Lord Mayor and Aldermen of' London disputed his appointment,
      and denied that the custody of their prison was in the gift of the Sheriffs.
      Wollaston therefore was forcibly ejected from Newgate after six weeks of office, and
      the keys were delivered to the nominee of the Corporation. He was restored,
      however, by the House of Commons on his petition; for he was the Keeper of Newgate,
      on 23dJune 1646, to whom Colonel John Lilburne gave formal notice that he
      denied the competency of the Lords to judge him, and that he would not appear
      before them except by force. Wollaston was soon afterwards superseded by
      the Parliament, for he was loyal to the King, and contributed to his Majesty's
      expenses at Oxford. He then returned to his business in Lombard-street, and his
      wife died there on 27th Dec. 1655. His dismissal from office and opposition
      to the Parliament completely alienated him from his brother John, who was a conspicuous
      member of the opposite party, and Henry was wholly ignored by Sir John
      Wollaston's Will and Settlement. This loss of all share in his brother's wealth
      was of serious consequence to him, for his business failed, and in his later years he
      was reduced to poverty. On 26th March 1663 he petitioned to the King to be
      admitted a pensioner at Sutton's Hospital, in the place of Edward Sherburne of
      Ribbleton, Lancashire, who had never made his appearance at the hospital since his
      nomination. He was then seventy years of age, and produced the receipt of
      Captain Robert Bradshaw for 50l. lent to the late King, which was still owing to
      him. His petition was granted, and he died a poor brother in the Charterhouse
      on Christmas-day 1669. Letters of Administration were granted on 21st
      Jan. 1669-70 to Henry Wollaston, one of his next of kin and a creditor, who was,
      I presume, his cousin-german Henry Wollaston of Waltham Abbey. This implies
      that he left no children; but it is confidently stated in the extinct Baronetage, and
      in the county histories of Hertfordshire and Leicestershire, that Henry Wollaston, brother of Sir John, was the father of Richard Wollaston the gunfounder,
      who purchased the manors of Loseby in Leicestershire and of Wormley in Hertfordshire.
      I am unable to discover any evidence whatever for the received account
      of the origin of the Wollastons of Loseby, and there are many presumptions
      against it.
      Richard Wollaston was a major in the Parliamentary Army in 1645
    • Source: http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ivorjackson/736.htm

      Henry Wollaston was a citizen of London and a haberdasher by trade. He carried on his business in Lombard Street. In October 1638 he was appointed keeper of Newgate prison by his brother John (later Lord Mayor of London) who was Sheriffof London at the time. The Lord Mayor and Aldermen disputed his appointment and denied that the custody of their prison was in the gift of the Sheriffs. Henry, therefore, was forcibly ejected from Newgate after six weeks of office andthe keys were delivered to the nominee of the Corporation. The House of Commons restored him, however, on his petition; for he was the keeper of Newgate on the 23rd June 1646, to whom Colonel John Lilburne gave formal notice that he deniedthe competency of the Lords to try him. Henry was soon afterwards superseded by Parliament, for he was loyal to the King and contributed to the King's expenses at Oxford. His dismissal from office and opposition to Parliament completelyalienated him from his brother John and he received nothing under his brother's will. He returned to his business as a haberdasher, but this failed and he was reduced to poverty. In 1663 he petitioned to King Charles II to be admitted apensioner at Button's Hospital. He produced an I. O. U. For £50 lent to King Charles I during the Civil War. His petition was granted and he died in the Charterhouse.(Source Waters).It is confidently stated in Burke's Extinct Baronetage and in Nichols History of Leicestershire, that Henry was the father, of Richard Wollaston of Loseby (see Appendix for account of Richard). There is no other evidence, however,as to the truth of this. See 'History of the Wollastons for a discussion of this.