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 Williston One-Name Study

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51 http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ivorjackson/donovan/072-loseby.html


Richard (c.1678-1728). son of John, married Faith Brown and was an M.P. for Whitchurch, Hants. 1695-1708. He was expelled from the House in 1698. In 1697 he became Receiver General of Taxes for county Herts, on securities of £25,000 and in the same year was appointed Receiver for Births, Marriags and Houses on further security of £12,000.

Accompanied by the memorial he sets forth his services amongst which he says he lent £10.000 to the Prince of Orange. He served in Parliament for 14 years, etc.

The memorial states he was chosen as M.P. for Whitchurch (Hants.) in 1696, served till Lord Oxford dissolved the Ministry and the Queen the Parliament until "Mr. Tilny and Mr. Vernon spent £7.000 to turn Mr. Wollaston out," who had for above 14 years kept up an honest interest at incredible expense. He always brought a friend in, particularly General Shrimpton when he was abroad in the army at the usual time of the elections and was not only at expenses there but at several boroughs and counties at every new election to bring in honest gentlemen, and though he did not stand himself in this Parliament he spared no effort or pains to get those chosen that were attached to H.M.'s interest in several counties and boroughs. He went on to say that he had 23 children and neither he nor any of them has had the least place under the Government. My Lord's order case to be heard.

Of all the children of Richard, I have no record excepting that one became a clergyman and another is George of whom Henry Wollaston writes, though it would appear his "tricks" were different from those of his father.

His dislike of his schoolmaster's wife led George to unnail the boards in the lavatory floor. His timing was successful for it was the lady who evoked his displeasure who was the first entrant and on stepping on the boards she was precipitated into the river beneath. As he had been sent to Bishop Stortford to school it must have been the River Stort that acted as the town sewer. George trained with a solicitor at Lincoln's Inn and became a J.P.. but was struck off the list by the Lord Chancellor for improper conduct. He got into debt and joined a cavalry regiment at 6d. a day. He served at the Battle of Preston without distinction. He went to Spain in an expedition against the Spaniards, was taken prisoner on a marauding escapade, thrown into gaol and later joined the Spanish army but his drinking habits continued to impede any advancement he might have made in any theatre of war. 
Wollaston, Richard Of Whitchurch, Hants (I151)
 
52 http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ivorjackson/donovan/072-loseby.html

As neither of these Richards could have had sons after 1650, we return to our search, and find Richard, son of Walter, born at Bishop's Castle in 1619, and as there is no record of his death as a child he has left no record in the family tree which is strange, because the family is otherwise traced in some detail. Having found one Richard there has to be another, and I can only assume that he may have come from the Northants. family. 
Wollaston, Richard (I148)
 
53 http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ivorjackson/donovan/072-loseby.html

First we start looking for a Richard born after 1600 and find Richard, son of Richard and Ann Watkins, born 1614 (godfather William Willaston). He became a draper in London and had a wife Dorothy. Strangely enough he died in the same year as Richard son of Hugh who, also a draper, had the "Golden Lion" in Cornhill.

Richard and Ann had moved to London where Ann died at Wandsworth in 1635. Son Richard having gone into the drapery business with several others had the contract for supplying clothing for the army in Ireland, and claiming £40,055-18-8 in 1643.

In this same year Richard applied for a Puritan preacher for St. Peters, Cornhill.

In 1646 they made further claims for supplying army uniforms, this time £43,000 and £37,000 of which they collected £2000 and £59,904-3-10¾. Two years later when Richard died his wife Dorothy with the others was claiming £26,000, so it was evidently a profitable business. 
Wollaston, Richard (I94)
 
54 http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ivorjackson/donovan/072-loseby.html

Of all the children of Richard, I have no record excepting that one became a clergyman and another is George of whom Henry Wollaston writes, though it would appear his "tricks" were different from those of his father.

His dislike of his schoolmaster's wife led George to unnail the boards in the lavatory floor. His timing was successful for it was the lady who evoked his displeasure who was the first entrant and on stepping on the boards she was precipitated into the river beneath. As he had been sent to Bishop Stortford to school it must have been the River Stort that acted as the town sewer. George trained with a solicitor at Lincoln's Inn and became a J.P.. but was struck off the list by the Lord Chancellor for improper conduct. He got into debt and joined a cavalry regiment at 6d. a day. He served at the Battle of Preston without distinction. He went to Spain in an expedition against the Spaniards, was taken prisoner on a marauding escapade, thrown into gaol and later joined the Spanish army but his drinking habits continued to impede any advancement he might have made in any theatre of war.
After deserting from the Spanish army he tried faith-healing as a pilgrim, and when that proved unsuccessful he tried being a doctor. Between these professions he made periodic visits to the Spanish gaols, finally enlisting with the Spanish Artillery from which he was ultimately rescued by his father. Returning to England he had acquired enough material to write "The Life and History of a Pilgrim." 
Wollaston, George (I154)
 
55 http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=114366

Woollaston's Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Josiah Woolaston Esquire,on Behalf of Sir Isaac Lawrence Woollaston Baronet, hisNephew, an Infant, of about the Age of Three Years;praying Leave to bring in a Bill, for Sale or Mortgageof an Estate at Haddenham in the Isle of Ely, and otherLands in the Counties of Huntingdon, Lincoln, and Norfolk, or a sufficient Part thereof, to raise Money fordischarging Encumbrances upon the Manor of Lowesby,and Lands adjacent, in the County of Leicester:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the saidPetition be, and is hereby, referred to Mr. JusticeBirch and Mr. Baron Smythe; who are forthwith tosummon all Parties concerned in the Bill; and, afterhearing them, are to report to the House the State ofthe Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under theirHands, and whether all Parties who may be concernedin the Consequences of the Bill have signed the Petition;and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, dosign the same.

From: 'House of Lords Journal Volume 28: January 1754', Journal of the House of Lords volume 28: 1753-1756 (1767-1830), pp. 183-193. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=114366 Date accessed: 07 November 2011. 
Wollaston, Richard of Losbey and Wormley? (I135)
 
56 http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=29307&strquery=Wollaston

Journal of the House of Commons: volume 10: 1688-1693

Mercurii, 8 die Februarii ; 4° Gulielmi et Mariæ.

Prayers.

Wollaston's Estate.

SIR Rowland Gwynn reported from the Committeeto whom the ingrossed Bill from the Lords, intituled,An Act for confirming the Sale of certain Woodlands inthe County of Southampton, and certain Articles of Agreement, made between Isaac Wollaston and Richard Wollaston, Esquires, was committed, That they had made anAmendment to the Bill: Which they had directed him toreport to the House; and which he read in his Place,with the Coherence: And afterwards delivered the samein at the Clerk's Table: Where the same was twice read;and agreed unto by the House.

From: 'House of Commons Journal Volume 10: 8 February 1693', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 10: 1688-1693 (1802), pp. 807-808. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=29307&strquery=Wollaston Date accessed: 07 November 2011. 
Wollaston, Richard of Losbey and Wormley? (I135)
 
57 http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42486

Sir Edward (Lawrence) apparently died without issue in 1749, and was succeeded by his great-nephew and heir, Sir Isaac Woollaston, bart., of Loseby (co. Leic.). Sir Isaac was the son of Isaac Woollaston by Sarah Lawrence, and grandson of Josiah Woollaston who married Elizabeth sister of Sir Edward Lawrence. (fn. 186) After the death of Sir Isaac in 1750, and of his infant son Sir Isaac Woollaston in 1756, the manor passed to the latter's sister Sarah (d. 1802), who married Taylor White (d. 1795). It then went to their second son, Lieut.-Col. Taylor White, (fn. 187) who livedat the manor house and of whose eccentricitiesmany remembrances survive. (fn. 188) He lost his money,and after his death in 1847 the property was sold inlots in the following year. A portion of the landwas purchased for the cemetery, and the Hall, whichwas a red brick building standing on the site of thepresent Cromwell Place, was dismantled and soldas building material. The house had been let for sometime to Rev. John Rugeley, who kept a girls' school,and on its sale he built the present Slepe Hall, on theRamsey Road. (fn. 189)

From: 'Parishes: St Ives', A History of the County of Huntingdon: Volume 2 (1932), pp. 210-223. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42486 Date accessed: 07 November 2011. 
Wollaston, Richard of Losbey and Wormley? (I135)
 
58 http://www.heraldicapellido.com/w5/Wollaston_de_loseby.htm
This shows that the coat of Arms for Wollaston of Losbey is quite different from that of Shenton. 
Wollaston, Richard of Losbey and Wormley? (I135)
 
59 http://www.rogerco.freeserve.co.uk/wolltree.htm

(D) Children of William and Elizabeth Farquier

Children: William (1731-1797) Col. Eastern Battalion of Suffolk Militia, M.P. for Ipswich, m. Blanch Page sister of Sir Thomas-Hyde Page
.............: Frances (1732 d.s.p. in 1755) d. at Bengal.
.............: Frederick (1735-1801) prebendary of Peterborough, m. (1) Mary d. of Orbel Ray (2) Priscilla Ottley (for children see G below)
.............: Samuel (1736-1790)
.............: Catherine (1738-1801) m. (in 1796) Rev. Ed. Bouchier
.............: Robert (1741-1774) m. Judith Hatley
.............: Elizabeth m.(1) (in 1753 Hon. William-Richard Chetwynd. (2) Jeffery Thompson M.D.
.............: Mary m. Thomas Mulcaster, Esq.



(G) Children of Frederick and Priscilla Ottley d. of D.Ottley Esq. of St. Kitts..

Child: John Henry (1770-1833)(Educated: Cambridge, King's Chaplain, Rector of Scotter) m. (in 1803) Louisa Symonds
........................................Children: Frederick William (1804-1879) Capt. in the Enniskillen dragoons
.....................................................: Edward Ottley (1820-1892)(Capt. 62 Bengal Native Infantry Regiment) m. Sarah Uppleby
.......................................................................................Child: Henry Uppleby (Electrical Engineer)
..................................................................................................................Child: One son
.....................................................: Thomas Vernon (1822-1878) m. (in 1869) Edith Shephard (no Children)(educated: Cambridge, F.L.S. a friend of Charles Darwin, entomologist and conchologist)
.....................................................: Charles (1806-1882) in the E.I. Co's cavalry
.....................................................: Louisa (1808-1881) m. (in 1834 Rev. Henry Frederick Hutton, rector of Gate Burton, Lincs.
.....................................................: Henry John (1805 - ---) Rector of Byfield
.....................................................: George (1807-1818)
.....................................................: William (1810-1818) d. in India
.....................................................: Charlton James (1811-1818)
.....................................................: Robert Septimus (1813-1814)
.....................................................: Arthur (1814-1828)
.....................................................: Charlotte Catherine d. unmarried in 1834
.....................................................: Frances Priscilla
.....................................................: Lucy Jane
.....................................................: Harriet (d. young) 
Wollaston, William of Finborough (I106)
 
60 http://www.rogerco.freeserve.co.uk/wolltree.htm

(E) Children of Francis and Mary Farquier

Children: Mary (1730-1813) m. Dr. W.Heberden (1710-1801)(his 2nd Marriage)
.............: Charlton (M.D., F.R.S.) (1733-1764)( Physician to the Queen's Household) m. (in 1758) Phillis Byam
...............................................Child: Charlton Byam (Assistant Judge Advocate) (1765-1840)
.............: Francis (F.R.S.) (1737-1815(Educated Cambridge, Priest and Astronomer) m.(in 1758) Althea Hyde (for children see F below)
.............: George(F.R.S.) (1738-1828) ( Educated: Charterhouse & Cambridge, Rector) m. (in 1765) Elizabeth Palmer of Thurnscoe Hall
..............................................Child: Elizabeth.
............: William-Henry (1737 d.s.p.in 1759)

(F) Children of Francis and Althea Hyde (lived Chislehurst in Kent)

Children: Mary Hyde (1760-1843) m.(in 1803) Rev W. Panchen
.............: Althea Hyde (1760-1785) m.(on 19.12.1784) Dr.W.Heberden(28.9.1754 - 17.10.1843)Heberden Family Tree
...............................................Children: Charles b. 1815
............................................................: Phillis-Byam m (in 1781) Evelyn Shirley of Eatington.
.............: Francis-John-Hyde (1762-1823) of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge (natural philosopher), m. (in 1793) Frances Hales
.............: Charlotte Hyde (1763-1835)
.............: Katherine Hyde (1764-1844) (Conchologist of Elthan)
.............: George Hyde (1765-1841)of Clapham Common m. (in 1796) Mary-Ann (d.1817), d. of Wm Luard of Dorset Street (had issue).
.............: Charles Hyde (1772-1850) Vicar of East Dereham m. Sarah d, of Wm Ottley of St Kitts
.....................................................Child: William-Charles M.A.(1795 - --) m. (in 1817) Charlotte-Jane Fawcett of Leeds (had issue)
.............: Louisa Hyde (1771-1772)
.............: Frederick Hyde (1770-1839? went to America in 1796) (his sister-in-law was Mary Ann Luard)
.............: Anna Hyde (1769-1828) unmarried
.............: Henrietta Hyde (1767-1840)
.............: William Hyde (6.8.1766 - 22.12.1828) physiologist, Chemist, and physicist
.............: Henry Hyde (1774-1774)
.............: Amelia Hyde (1775-1860)
.............: Henry-Septimus-Hyde (1776-1867) m. (Married 3 times and had issue)
.............: Sophia Hyde (1777-1810) unmarried
.............: Louisa Decima Hyde (1778-1854) m. (in 1806) Rev. James Leonard Jackson of Dorsetshire
.............: Child
.............: Child 
Wollaston, Francis (I104)
 
61 http://www.rogerco.freeserve.co.uk/wolltree.htm

The Wollastons are descended from an old Staffordshire Family


Henry Wollaston (1556 - 1616) of Trescott Grange, Staffs, alderman of London. m.
(1)(in 1579) Sarah d. of William Burgess of Kippington, Kent. (for children see B below)
(2)(in 1592) Alice Smith (nee Wollaston) (for children see A below)
(3)(in 1606) Margaret Colbourne


(A) Children of Henry and Alice

Child: Henry (1593-1670, m. (in 1617) Ursula Foxe.
.....................................Child: Henry (1625-1679)m. Anne Botelor
...........................................................Children: Henry b.1660.
........................................................................: Thomas b. 1666


(B) Children of Henry and Sarah

Children: Richard b.1580 m.(in 1613) Anne Watkins (d. 1635)
.......................................Child: Richard (1614-1648) m. Dorothy ---------.
.............: William (1580-1666) m.(1) (in 1618) Sarah Bennet
.......................................Child: Henry (1618-1663) m. Elizabeth Keightley.
............................................... m.(2) (in 1622) Ann d. of Humphrey Whitgrave of Bridgeford, Staffs.
.......................................Child: William (1623-1688) m. (in 1668) Elizabeth sole heir of Capt. Cave of Ingersby (6 children)
.............: Thomas(1587-1674) of Abbot's Langley, Herts and Oncott. m.(1) (in 1614) Philadelphia Vincent (son d. infant)
................................................m.(2) Sabrina d. of Sir George Oldrich
.......................................Children: George (c.1619-c.1641) of Trinity Coll.Cambridge, became a Jesuit.
....................................................: Thomas (b.1629) left issue
....................................................: William (1634- 10.3.1692)of Coton Clanford m. (c. 1657) Elizabeth Downes (d.24.9.1707) (for children see C below)
....................................................: Elizabeth
....................................................: Philadelphia
....................................................: Lucy 
Wollaston, Henry of Waltham (I21)
 
62 http://www.rogerco.freeserve.co.uk/wolltree.htm

William (1660-29.10.1724) Moral philosopher, author of 'Religion of Nature Delineated (1722 & 1724)' he owned Shenton Hall but lived at Charterhouse Sq. London.) m. (in 1689) Catherine Charlton 
Wollaston, William of Shenton (I70)
 
63 http://www.rogerco.freeserve.co.uk/wolltree.htm Wollaston, George (I62)
 
64 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N8TT-8HJ Wollaston, Joseph (I101)
 
65 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V5KS-PWQ Wollaston, Josiah (I162)
 
66 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.2/97FP-BG6/p1 Wollaston, Thomas of Litchfield (I98)
 
67 https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.2/97TY-1LZ/p1
Birth at Family search.org 
Wollaston, Richard (I28)
 
68 https://familysearch.org/search/collection/results?count=20&query=+surname%3AW%2All%2Aston%2A%7E&collection_id=1923399

Evidence that a George Wollostone died in Barbados in 1699.
Could this be connected to this individual? 
Wollaston, George (I62)
 
69 HUGH WOOLLASTON OF TRESCOTT GRANGE IN THE PArISH OF OVER PENNE, CO. STAFFORD. Will
dated 1 Feb. 1609-10.
To be buried in the Parish Church of Over Penne. To the poor of the said parish, 401., to be employed in same sort as the £8 given by my late father William Woollaston by his last Will.
To the poor of Tresull, 40 shillings; of Tettenhall, 40,.; of Wolverhampton, 40 •. ; of Patlingham,
20,.; of and of Wombome, 20s. To my three daughters Jane, Mary, and Elizabeth,
500 marks each at 21 or marriage. My executors to have the use and benefit of my close
called Jeffreys Bruche till my son Richard reach the age of 24, when it is to go to my eldest son
Edward. I have granted to' my near Kinsmen' and loving friends' Thomas Jurden, Humphrey
Jurden, William Barnsley, and John Dancer, a lease for 12 years of my mills, water-courses, and
certain lands, &c., of my manor or grange called Trescott Grange, &c.
Richard* Moseley Esq., John Fowke, Esq., Edmond Warings Esq., and William Moseley
Gent. to be my executors. The residue to be divided equally between my said children Edward,
Richard, Jane, Mary, and Elizabeth.
Will proved 7 Dec. 1610 in C.P.C. by the said Richard Moseley, power being reserved to the
other executors. [100 Wingfield.] 
Wollaston, Hugh of Trescott Grange (I18)
 
70 I. RICHARD WOLLASTON, the eldest son of Henry of Perton, was a citizen of
London, and was free of the Grocers' Company. He lived in Bucklersbury, and
married Margery, widow of • • . . Tyrrell, and daughter of Christopher Wase,
goldsmith of London, by whom he had four children. She sprang from a family
of good standing at Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, who were related to the Hampdens.
(18) He died in 1602, and was buried in the church of St. Bennet Sherehog
in Size-lane. 
Wollaston, Richard (I32)
 
71 Israel (1701-1765), son of Jonathan, married Sarah Waldo and had 20 children who all died in infancy. Sarah walked her dog in Lincoln's Inn Gardens and provided for him in her will. Wollaston, Israel (I160)
 
72 It appears from the Registers of Penn that William Wollaston of the Grange was not the only one
of his family who was living at that time in Penn for Harri Wollaston had seven children baptized
there between 1669 and 1684. I am wholly unable to fix Harri's place in the pedigree, for he is too
old to be the son or nephew of William of the Grange, and he is too young to be his brother. 
Wollaston, Harri (I172)
 
73 It appears from the Registers of Penn that William Wollaston of the Grange was not the only one
of his family who was living at that time in Penn for 'Harri Wollaston' had seven children baptized
there between 1669 and 1684. I am wholly unable to fix Harri's place in the pedigree, for he is too
old to be the son or nephew of William of the Grange, and he is too young to be his brother. 
Wollaston, William of Trescot Grange. (I9)
 
74 It is highly unsatisfactory to find that the name of William Wollaston's father and brother are
differently stated in the only two pedigrees which notice their existence. In the Statfordshire Visitation
of 1662 he is the son of John and the brother of Thoma; (8) whilst in the Heralds' pedigree of 1669
he is the son of Thomas and brother of John, which John was father of Thomas, born in 1515, who
married 13 June 1541 Joan, daughter of John Ham of Walsall, and was the ancestor of the Wollastons
of Walsall. (I S) 
Wollaston, John of Perton, Staff (I13)
 
75 JOHN WOLLASTON, the only son of Richard, has a legacy in the Will of
Sir John Wollaston in 1658, and was living in Spain on 22d July 1669, when he
entered his pedigree at the College of Arms, and the coat of Wollaston was allowed
to him with the filial difference of a crescent on a crescent. 
Wollaston, John (I30)
 
76 JUDITH WOLLASTON was in 1616 the wife of William Terry of Newington
Green, Middlesex, with two children, Thomas and Frances. Her husband was
afterwards knighted by James I., for he is described as Sir William Terry on 27th
Feb. 1622-3, when he was godfather to bis wife's niece at Waltham Abbey. 
Wollaston, Judith (I57)
 
77 name and info from Ancestry tree. To be confirmed Ward, Gracia (I144)
 
78 RICHARD and JOHN WOLLASTON were twins, and were baptized at
Shenton on 27th Jan. 1626-7. Richard was buried there on the same day, and
John was buried on 1st Feb. following. 
Wollaston, John (I86)
 
79 RICHARD and JOHN WOLLASTON were twins, and were baptized at
Shenton on 27th Jan. 1626-7. Richard was buried there on the same day, and
John was buried on 1st Feb. following. 
Wollaston, Richard (I87)
 
80 Richard Wollaston left two sons and two daughters, who were all under age at
the time of his death. 
Wollaston, Christopher (I36)
 
81 RICHARD WOLLASTON, Citizen and Fishmonger of London. Will dated 16 May 1648.
My wife Hannah to be my executrix. • My loving friends and neare alliance' Sir John
Wollaston Kt., Alderman of London, my wife's father Mr. Peter Hazard, merchant, and Roger
Hill Esq. of the Temple, Counsellor at Law, to be overseers of my Will. My brother-in-law and
partner Mr. Richard Husband to give an account of my stock·in-trade. To the two children of
Mr. Nicholas Lockyer 20 nobles each. To my kinswoman Mary§ Stephens, now living with me
in my house, .£100 towards her marriage. To my wife's two uumarrled§ sisters, 40 shillings
each. To my brother-in-law Husbands' two children, £20 each.
-The residue of my personal estate to be equally divided between my wife and my son John.
My house and brewhouse at Witham, Essex, to my wife for life, with remainder to my son John.
To my said son at 21 the lease of my house and shop. wherein I have long dwelt, called the
Golden Lyon, in Cornbill, London. If I have omitted anything proper to be done the same is to
be performed by my' wife and her three assistants.
Will proved in C.P.C. 10 Jan. 1648·{} by Hannah Wollaston the Widow. [4 Fairfax.] 
Wollaston, Richard (I28)
 
82 RICHARD WOLLASTON, CITIZEN AND GROC~R OF LONDON. Will dated 19 March 1600-1.
To be buried in the church of St. Benedict Sherehog; London, where I am a parishioner.
The money now in my hands belonging to Thomas Tirrell, son to Margerie my now wife, is to be
delivered into the hands of my brother Henry Wollaston, draper, or into the Orphans' Court in
Guildhall, London. H my four children Christopher, Edward, Elizabeth, and Margery all die
under age, then their portions to be divided between the children of my brother Edward Wollaston
of Perton, co. Stafford, and the children of my brother-in-law Thomas Perry of Trescott,
co. Stafford, equally. My wife Margery to have my now dwelling-house in Bucklersbury during
the minority of my eldest son Christopher, with remainder to said Christopher, remainder to my
son Edward, remainder to my daughters, remainder to my godson Richard, Bon of my brother
Henry Wollaston, remainder to William, another son of my said brother Henry, remainder to
the heirs of my brother Edward Wollaston, remainder to the Treasurer and Master of Christ's
Hospital.
My farm called Courtesden in Kent to my 2d son Edward Wollaston, remainder to my
son Christopher, remainder to my daughters, remainder as before declared about my dwellinghouse.
My wife Margery and my two sons Christopher and Edward to be my executors. My
brother-in-law Christopher* Wase, goldsmith, my brother Henry Wollaston, draper, and Thomas
White, citizen and grocer of London, to be overseers of my Will.
Witnu'6': Wm. Gwyn, Edwd. Bullock scr., Edwd. Perry, Christopher Gayler.
Will proved in C.P.C. on 20 Sept. 1602 by the widow. [61 Montague.] 
Wollaston, Richard (I32)
 
83 RICHARD WOLLASTON, son and heir apparent, is mentioned in the Will of
his uncle Richard in 1601, but died unmarried in Ireland in his father's lifetime.It may be guessed from the place of his death that, like some other
young men of his own condition from that part of Essex, he was serving as a Volunteer
in the Irish wars.
His son, Richard was born 1614, so it would have to have been between 1614 and 1616, as he was dead by the time his father died in 1616. 
Wollaston, Richard (I54)
 
84 Said to have had several children...most who died childless....Maybe some of them went to America? Wollaston, Isaac (I163)
 
85 SARAH WOLLASTON married at Waltham Abbey, on 5th Oct. 1612,
Samuel Middlemore, citizen of London, a cadet of the Middlemores of Edgebaston
in Warwickshire, and had a son Henry, to whom his grandfather left 100L. Middlemore was one of his father-in-law's executors in 1616, and was godfather
to his wife's nephew at Waltham Abbey on 23d Feb. 1625-6. 
Wollaston, Sarah (I72)
 
86 Source: http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ivorjackson/736.htm

Henry Wollaston was a citizen of London and a haberdasher by trade. He carried on his business in Lombard Street. In October 1638 he was appointed keeper of Newgate prison by his brother John (later Lord Mayor of London) who was Sheriffof London at the time. The Lord Mayor and Aldermen disputed his appointment and denied that the custody of their prison was in the gift of the Sheriffs. Henry, therefore, was forcibly ejected from Newgate after six weeks of office andthe keys were delivered to the nominee of the Corporation. The House of Commons restored him, however, on his petition; for he was the keeper of Newgate on the 23rd June 1646, to whom Colonel John Lilburne gave formal notice that he deniedthe competency of the Lords to try him. Henry was soon afterwards superseded by Parliament, for he was loyal to the King and contributed to the King's expenses at Oxford. His dismissal from office and opposition to Parliament completelyalienated him from his brother John and he received nothing under his brother's will. He returned to his business as a haberdasher, but this failed and he was reduced to poverty. In 1663 he petitioned to King Charles II to be admitted apensioner at Button's Hospital. He produced an I. O. U. For £50 lent to King Charles I during the Civil War. His petition was granted and he died in the Charterhouse.(Source Waters).It is confidently stated in Burke's Extinct Baronetage and in Nichols History of Leicestershire, that Henry was the father, of Richard Wollaston of Loseby (see Appendix for account of Richard). There is no other evidence, however,as to the truth of this. See 'History of the Wollastons for a discussion of this. 
Wollaston, Henry (I43)
 
87 Story: From World Wide Wollastons

In 1618 Henry sold two of the houses he inherited from his father in the parish St Lawrence, Eastcheap in the City of London and in 1646 the remaining four houses were sold for £1,080.It was agreed in the marriage settlement that Henry and his wife should live with his father-in-law in Waltham for three years after the marriage. In 1620 at the end of the three years he went to live at Fishers Green, a house in Waltham, which also he inherited from his father. He was a man of very high position in Waltham and was a Justice of the Peace for Essex during the reign of Charles I, the Commonwealth and after the Restoration. His name is appended to nearly every contract ofmarriage in Waltham Abbey register between 1653 and 1657. The reason for this is that, owing to the shortage of clergymen during the Civil War, Justices of the Peace were authorised by law to effect marriages. In1651 he gave £1 towards purchasing buckets, ladders and firehooks for dealing with fires; and in 1668 he and Sir Richard Willis, Bart., successfully petitioned the King for permission to collect money for the repair ofWaltham Abbey. His bust in Waltham Abbey was damaged in December 2002 by a mentally disturbed person.
Wollaston, Henry of Waltham (I74)
 
88 The history of the Wollastons was written in the beginning of the last century
by William Wollaston, the well-known author of The Religion of Nature. His
narrative was inserted by Nichols in The History of Leicestershire, and was
reprinted in his Illustrations of Literary History. It has much literary merit;
and I should gladly have left it to so accomplished a writer to tell the story of his
ancestors, if my researches had permitted me to vouch for his genealogical accuracy.
But he took so little pains to gauge the truth of family traditions, and his statements
of fact are so often contradicted by Wills and Records, that his memoir is historically
worthless, and can only be regarded as an apology in disguise for the unnatural
Will under which he became possessed of the Shenton estate.
His assertion, that the family of Wollaston was ancient and had been considerable,' might be tacitly
dismissed as a mere flourish of rhetoric, if it had not been gravely repeated by the
whole series of modern genealogists. This is the more remarkable because the
ancient gentility of the Wollastons was unknown to Erdeswick; and they are
expressly named by Sir Simon* Degge in 1669 amongst the new families in Staffordshire
who had .risen by trade within the last sixty years.
It is certain that the Wollastons were yeomen in the neighbourhood of Wolverhampton, without pretension to gentility or coat-armour until the reign of
James I., when Henry Wollaston, citizen and draper of London, purchased several
manors in Staffordshire, and obtained the sanction of the Heralds to use armorial
bearings.
The name of Wollaston is of local origin, and occurs in several counties in
England. There are places called Wollaston in Northamptonshire, Staffordshire,
Gloucestershire, Shropshire, and Worcestershire, and in all these places obscure
'persons are found from an early period bearing the local name.
The ancestors of the Wollastons of Shenton came to London from Stafiordshire; and there is little
doubt that their original habitation was at Wollaston in the parish of Wheaton
Aston; but they were settled near Wolverhampton, at Perton in the parish of
Tettenhall, before the end of the 15th century. Their proved pedigree begins with
WILLIAM WOLLASTON, a substantial yeoman at Perton, who occurs in 16 Hen. VII
(1500-1) amongst the attesting witnesses of a local deed, and died at the age of
88 early in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. He was probably the uncle of Henry
Wollaston, who was one of the five priests of the college at Tettenhall at the time
of its dissolution in 1551, and, if we may believe· the Heralds of the 17th century,
he was the younger brother of the ancestor of the Wollastons of Walsall. 
Wollaston, John of Perton, Staff (I13)
 
89 The name of Wollaston is of local origin, and occurs in several counties in
England. There are places called Wollaston in N orthamptonshire, Staffordshire,
Gloucestershire, Shropshire, and Worcestershire, and in all these places obscure
'persons are found from an early period bearing the local name. The ancestors of
the Wollastons of Shenton came to London from Stafiordshire; and there is little
doubt that their original habitation was at Wollaston in the parish of Wheaton
Aston; but they were settled near Wolverhampton, at Perton in the parish of
Tettenhall, before the end of the 15th century. Their proved pedigree begins with
WILLIAM WOLLASTON, a substantial yeoman at Perton, who occurs in 16 Hen. VIT.
(1500-1) amongst the attesting witnesses of a local deed, and died at the age of
88 early in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. He was probably the uncle of Henry
Wollaston, who was one of the five priests of the college at Tettenhall at the time
of its dissolution in 1551, and, if we may believe· the Heralds of the 17th century,
he was the younger brother of the ancestor of the Wollastons of Walsall.
William lies buried in Tettenhall Church, and a brass plate on an alabaster
gravestone in the middle aisle bears the following inscription:
Here lyeth William Wollaston, who long WIle lived in health,
Whose honest life, still making peace, did far exceed his wealth
With sweat of brow he went to plow, he eate still of his labour;
o well was he, and ever free from law and lawyer's favour.
Three sons, one daughter, here he left, all able well to live,
Whose prayers did advance them more than wealth that he could give.
He fourscore yeus and eight did live, beloved of rich and poore,
And saw his children well bestowed; what could he ask for more ?
Twelve years before his death God tooke his loving wife away;
Then he all worldly goods forsooke, and nothing did but pray.
His seRBes to the last he had, the world he did defye,
Still crying, • Come, Lord Jesu, come,' till death did close his eye. 
Wollaston, William of Trescott Grange (I8)
 
90 Thomas was the youngest son of Captain Henry Wollaston of Waltham Abbey, and was then 22
yean old. (at the time of william of shenton's Will 1688)He had probably been the friend of the testator's son Francis, who was nearly of the same age, and was buried at Waltham Abbey 6 Dec. 1684.
Was left something in his cousin's Will- William Wollaston of Shenton who d in 1688 
Wollaston, Thomas (I138)
 
91 THOMAS WOLLASTON is described in the family Wills after his brother
George's disappearance as his father's eldest son. He lived at Doxey in Staffordshire, and became in 1688, on the death of his cousin William of Shenton, the head
of the family. He was provided for by an annuity of 150L a year, and had two
sons, who both married and had issue. 
Wollaston, Thomas (I63)
 
92 THOMAS WOLLASTON was born in 1587, and was educated at St. John's
College, Cambridge. He was bred to the law; and his father gave him 1200L
to buy the office of Philazer for Yorkshire in the Court· of Common Pleas. He
married at St. Anne's, Blackfriars, on 15th Dec. 1614,· Philadelphia, daughter and
heir of John Vincent, when his father settled on him an estate of 200L a year in
Essex, consisting of Bretts Manor in the parish of West Ham and a farm at
Plaistow, which he had purchased in 1609 from the Countess of Oxford. His
wife died in childbed with her infant son in the year after her marriage, but
Thomas had the reversionary fee of the settled estate devised to him by his father's
Will.
Thomas married secondly at Tottenham, Middlesex, on 23dApri11618, Sabina,
daughter of Sir George Aldrych Kt., by whom he had six children. He resided
after his second marriage at Abbots Langley in Hertfordshire, where he had a small
estate; but his habits of life were extravagant, and he soon spent the whole of his
patrimony, as well as the money which he received from the sale of his Philazership.
Men of broken fortunes are easily suspected of disaffection to the Government;
and Thomas was so far compromised by unguarded expressions amongst his boon
companions that he thought it prudent to conceal himself for a time in Ireland.
On his return. he lived in retirement at Oncote in Staffordshire, when his brother
William lent him a house, and allowed him an annnity. But the last years of his
life were spent in his son William's house at Shenston in Staffordshire, where he
died at the age of 87 in April 1674.
He had issue by his second wife six children, who made little effort to retrieve
the fallen fortunes of their family, and were contented to live as dependents on
their kinsman at Shenton. 
Wollaston, Thomas (I59)
 
93 was the only one of Henry's three sons who was contented to lead a country life. He was, like his father, a yeoman at Perton, and married Elizabeth, the daughter of his uncle William Wollaston of Trescot Grange. Edward outlived his wife and both his brothers, and had issue four children. Wollaston, Edward (I22)
 
94 WILLIAll 'WOLLASTON Of PERTON IN THE PARISH 0f TETTENHALL, STAFFORDSHIRE, YEOMAN.
Will dated 16 Jan. 1628-9
To be buried in Tettenhall Church near my ancestors. My debts to be paid out of my goods,
of which my wife Eleanor is to have the residue during her widowhood; but if she marry again
or die, the same is to be divided between my four daughters Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, aud Judith.
My wife is to occupy my leasehold cottage and lands in Overton so long as she keepeth herself
sole. To the poor of Tettenhall, 20 shillings. My said wife to be my Sole executrix.
Will proved in C.P.C. by the widow on 5 Sept. 1629. [79 Ridley.] 
Wollaston, William (I41)
 
95 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I16)
 
96 William Wollaston of Shenton, co. Leicester, ESQ., 'in good and perfect health and
memorie. Willl not dated).
To be buried in The vault in Shenton church where' my wife' was buried, and a small monument
to be set up over the spot; or else to be huried at Measham or Narborow, and the monument
to be set up there.
My manors of Great Finborowe, with Cantellewos and Adder's Hall in Suffolk, and my
manors of Kirby Muxloe, Saddington, and Narborowe in Leicestershire, to my only son William
Wollaston and his heirs male, with remainder to Elizabeth, wife of my said son William; Sir
George Villiers of Brookesby, co. Leicester, Baronet; Thomas Banaster of Upton, co. Leicester.
Esq.; Samuel Roper of Lincoln's Inn Esq.; John Cholmeley of St. Dunstan's in the West of
London Gent.; and William Fox of Shenton Gent., as trustees, to raise portions of .£5000 each
for such daughter or daughters as my said son William shall leave, and subject thereto to the
use of William Wollaston Gent., 2nd son of my brother Thomas Wollaston, and his heirs male.

The said manors and lands to be charged with the payment of the following life annuities:
To Mr. Thomas Wollaston (eldest son of my said brother Thomas Wollaston), .£145 per annum
during the life of Mrs. Elizabeth Cary, relict of my son Henry Wollaston deceased, and also .£10
per annum during the life of my said brother Thomas. To Elizabeth Wollaston, Philadelphia
Wollaston, and Mrs. Lucy Manistry, sisters of the said Thomas and William Wollaston and
daughters of my said brother Thomas, £10 each per annum. To Francis Hansell, 30s per annum.
To Mrs. Dorothy Thornebury, £50 per annum. To Mrs. Elizabeth Wollaston, wife of my son
William Wollaston, £150 per annum.

My manors of Shenton and Upton and my capital messuage of Bloforley in Leicstershire,
and my manors of Chebsey, Shawford, and Wollaston in Staffordshire, to my son William Wollaston
and his heirs male, with remainder to the same trustees and for the same purposes as before
mentioned concerning my other settled estates. Certain woods in Bedfordshire and lands at
Enderby in Leicestershire to my son William Wollaston in fee. My said son to be my sole
executor.
Witnesses: Wm. Fox, John Brooke, A. Spence, Dorothy Thornbury, Fran. Stampton.
Will proved in C.P.C. 20 May 1667 by the Son. [74 Carr.] 
Wollaston of Shenton, William Esq. (I1)
 
97 WILLIAM WOLLASTON OF SHENTON, co. LEICESTER, ESQ., infirm of body, but of sound and perfect
mind and memory. Will dated 20 April 1688.
To be buried in Shenton Church. To my wife Elizabeth, my manor of Shenton for life, and
all my household goods, plate, coaches, coach-horses, &C., absolutely. To my cousin William
Wollaston, clerk (second son of William Wollaston of Great BIoxwitch, co. Stafford, Gent.), and
the heirs male of his body all and singular, my manors of Upton and Narborough with the
advowson of Narborough; my lands at BIoford and Enderbie and my mills at Swepston in
Leicestershire; also my manors of Chebsey, Shawford, and Wollaston also Olston, and other
lands in Staffordshire; also my manor and advowson of Measham in Derbyshire; and also my
manors of Finborow and Addershall-cum-Cantelawes in Suffolk; and in default of his issue,
remainder to Thomas Wollaston of London upholsterer, one of the sons of Henry Wollaston
late of Waltham, Essex, Gent., deceased.
John Cholmeley of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, London, Gent., and John Cave, Rector of
Nelson, co. Leicester, clerk, to be trustees for the support of contingent remainders and for the
payment of the annuities charged on the said estates. To my cousin Thomast Wollaston of
Doxey, Staffordshire, Gent., £150 per annum, and to his wife £80 per annum, and £10 per annum
to each of their children. To my cousin William Wollaston of Great BIoxwitch before mentioned,
£150 per annum, and to his wife £80 per annum, and to their children £10 per annum
each.
My lands at Lea Grange in Merevale, co. Warwick, to my wife Elizabeth for life, remainder
to my daughter Anne Chester for life, remainder to my grandson William Chester, eldest son
and heir apparent of John Chester Esq. by my said daughter Anne, in fee_ William Beebie,
formerly servant to my son Francis, to have a lease of a farm at Sutton. My lands at Thorpe
Emald and Sutton Cheynell, co. Leicester, and at Coton Clauford, co. Stafford, to my daughter
Rebecca Wilkins in fee. To my godchildren Herbert Monck and Wollaston Winnington,
40s. each. To Mr. Edward Alsop and Mrs. Elizabeth Alsop his sister, 20,. each. To my son-in-
law John Chester Esq., £100. The before-mentioned John Cholmeley and John Cave to be
joint executors with my wife.

Witnesses Danvers Hodges, Hen. Bonsall, Wm. Fox, Robt. Tarleton, Tho. Miles.
CODICIL dated 17 Aug. 1688 Small legacies to servants.
Witnesses: Ann Chester, Re. Wilkins, Jolm Chester, John Wilkins.
Will and Codicil proved in C.P.C. 6th Oct. 1688 [144 Exton.] 
Wollaston of Shenton, William (I84)
 
98 William Wollaston purchased Trescott Grange in 1557 from an assignee of the Crown and was thereafter known as William Wollaston of the Grange. He died possessed of the mill at Trescott and lands in Trysull, Wombourne and Overton. He left a legacyof £8 to the poor of the parish of Over-Penn in which Trescott Grange is situate to be distributed in bread.

Domsday With the Wollastons

His son Hugh maintained this costom, providing for them in his will. 
Wollaston, William of Trescot Grange. (I9)
 
99 WILLIAM WOLLASTON, the eldest son of William of Perton, removed into the
parish of Over Penne, where he purchased the Grange in the hamlet of Trescot,
which lies a mile beyond Perton. He married Jane Jurden or Jordayne of
Dunsley, who died before him, leaving several children, and was buried at Penn
5th May 1591. William lived to a great age, and died 7th Jan. 1603-4.
He was buried at Penn on 9th January following, and it was found at the
inquest held after his death that he died seised of the Grange and mill at Trescot
in Over Penne, and also of lands in Trysull, Womburne, and. Overton, and that
his heir was his son Hugh, who was then 50 years of age. His Will is not on
record, hut we know from his son's Will that it contained a legacy 'of 8l. to the poor
of Over Penne, to be distributed in bread. He had several children, of whom only
four can be identified with certainty, viz. i. HUGH, his son and heir; II. THOMAS,
who died in his father's lifetime, and was huried at Penn 2d June 1600;III. ALICE; and IV. ELIZABETH, who "both married their cousins. 
Wollaston, William of Trescot Grange. (I9)
 
100 WILLIAM WOLLASTON, the only surviving son of William of Shenton by Anne
Whitgreve, was born in 1623, and like his brother Henry was educated at Cambridge
and an Inn of Court. He was admitted at the Inner Temple on 1st Dec. 1645,
and lived there for several years in chambers. He was still a younger brother,
when he married in 1666 Elizabeth Cave, the only child of Lady Villiers of Brooks by
by her second husband Captain Francis Cave. 
Wollaston of Shenton, William (I84)
 

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